02.19.07

Looking at game data through Many Eyes

Posted in development, games, semantic web, technology, web at 1:53 pm by wingerz

manyeyes.jpg

Yesterday I blogged about creating an Exhibit for a list of the 100 best-selling games of 2006. Exhibit is great for looking at how data items fall into categories, but it’s not as good for visualizing quantities. IBM’s own Many Eyes provides several very nice visualization tools (Swivel allows data upload and visualization as well, but I am not that familiar with it, and it looks like someone beat me to it).

I uploaded my text data and created a few quick visualizations.
Review score vs. sales. As people have already remarked, a well-reviewed game won’t necessarily sell that well. Alas.
Release month. This is a recreation of one of the charts that appeared in the original Next Generation article. Summer is always kind of quiet and things get more exciting towards the holidays.
Categorization treemap. This is one of my favorite data viewers. Each game is a rectangle. The area is the number of sales. You can drag the labels (next to “Treemap organization”) in order to redraw the treemap. Drag “publisher” all the way to the left to see why EA cranks out annual releases of their sports titles. Drag “genre” over to see the portion of sales that are sports titles or games based on licenses. Dragging “systems” over doesn’t give you a great view of the data because the original data wasn’t all that clean and Many Eyes doesn’t seem to handle multi-value properties. I’m not sure why it’s showing a quote about the game by default instead of the title.

My other favorite data viewer (that I was not able to use) is the Stacked Graph viewer, made popular by the Baby Name Voyager.

One last note: I wasn’t allowed to edit the visualizations after I created them, so keep that in mind as you think of titles and tags for them.

2 Comments »

  1. John said,

    February 19, 2007 at 5:06 pm

    A well-reviewed game won’t necessarily sell well, but a poorly-reviewed game will definitely not sell well, so at least people know how to avoid a really crappy game.

  2. wingerz said,

    February 19, 2007 at 5:29 pm

    Nicely put. Yeah, there seems to be that bottom line that nothing crosses. Unfortunately, 70%s and the low 80%s are usually mediocre and not satisfying.

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